One of the most revered Romantic composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Richard Strauss’s symphonic poems and operas remain an indispensable feature of the standard repertoire. This program—which includes the operatic rarity Die Liebe der Danae (The Love of Danae) from the 2011 Bard SummerScape along with various symphonic and choral works—explores the composer’s…

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Socially-distanced live chamber music performance in the beautiful setting of Washington Lake Park Amphitheater in Sewell, New Jersey. A string quartet featuring musicians from the ASO will perform a program of works by Black composers. Featuring concertmaster Cyrus Beroukhim, violinist Philip Payton, principal viola William Frampton, and cellist Alberto Parrini. This program of all Black…

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One of “The Five,” a group of 19th-century composers in Russia, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908) was well known for his development of a distinctly Russian style of classical music. His musical language heavily incorporated Russian folk songs and fairy tales, while repudiating traditional Western compositional influences in favor of creating a body of nationalistic repertoire. Arguably…

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A great nation in turmoil after the abrupt end to a ruling dynasty leaving no clear path forward. This was Russia in the Time of Troubles, the seventeenth-century period in which Antonín Dvořák set his 1882 opera Dimitrij. A stellar cast along with the Bard Festival Chorale animate this powerful production by Anne Bogart for…

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In partnership with Music at Bunker Hill, we are happy to offer a free, socially-distanced chamber music performance in the beautiful setting of Washington Lake Park Amphitheater in Sewell, New Jersey. A string quartet featuring ASO’s concertmaster Cyrus Beroukhim, principal violin Richard Rood, principal viola William Frampton, and cellist Alberto Parrini will perform Samuel Barber’s…

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Alexander von Zemlinsky (1871-1942) first premiered his symphonic poem Die Seejungfrau (The Mermaid, 1903) during the Vereinigung Schaffender Tonkünstler’s second concert in 1905. Though the piece was based on Hans Christian Andersen’s 1836 tale, it is often noted that Zemlinsky composed Seejungfrau in response to his heartbreak after one of his former loves, Alma Mahler,…

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A contemporary of Saint-Saëns, Emmanuel Chabrier was an independent-minded and important innovator—many saw him as having paved the way for French modernism. With his comic opera The King in Spite of Himself, he succeeded in creating a sophisticated and forward-looking piece. This stylish and elegant production from the 2012 Bard SummerScape festival as directed by…

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One of the leading composers of the 20th century, Alban Berg was born in 1885 to an affluent family in Vienna, Austria. Initially trained by his aunt in piano, Berg soon showed a proclivity to composing in his early teens, later becoming a student of Arnold Schoenberg’s in 1904. Together—with another one of Schoenberg’s students,…

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This week’s offering from the archives of the Bard Music Festival celebrates the music of two seminal composers from south of the border: Carlos Chávez and Silvestre Revueltas. In times of political uncertainty, they fused the rich indigenous heritage of Mexico with modernist techniques and a political message, creating an art that was national, modern,…

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Nowadays unjustly neglected, Neoclassical composer Walter Piston is often praised for his individuality and disciplined handling of material, which is highly evident in Violin Concerto No. 1.  In his youth, Piston taught himself how to play violin and piano, and upon enlisting in the Navy band at the start of WWI—​prior to his studies at Harvard—he taught himself to play saxophone.…

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